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Lesson Learned from Pernille - Connections Start with Eye Contact

I've got a embarrassing confession to make:  I haven't felt super connected to my kids this year.  It's not that they aren't amazing or funny or kind or interesting.  It's that I've been overwhelmed and discouraged and frustrated and busy.

#buriedbythegrind

Trying to cram a massive curriculum into 50 minute class periods means that there's never enough time to think or to laugh with my students.  Heck, sometimes I even cringe when a kid wants to ask a question because I'm not sure that we will have the time to look for the answer before needing to move on.

And in the hopes of getting home before 5:30 every day, I've fallen into the unhealthy pattern of spending the few free minutes that I do have with my kids (before class, during transitions, at lunch time) checking my email or trying to nail down planning details.  The result:  I almost never have an uninterrupted, genuine interaction with a student during the day.  Worse yet:  I've caught myself actively avoiding uninterrupted interactions because they steal minutes from the planning tasks I'm trying to power through.

#ickchat

Then I read Pernille Ripp's newest book: Passionate Learners.  

One of the simplest recommendations that Pernille makes is that teachers give students  complete attention, no matter what they want to ask or say.  "Eye contact," she writes, "is one of the biggest tools we have as teachers to establish trust, community, and respect. If you want to tell a child that they matter, look at them when they speak with you. Stop and be present whenever you can, rather than multitask."

Her words left me convicted because I knew that being fully present is something that I'd stolen from my students this year.

The consequences:  I'm not sure that my kids know that I actually care about them.  They rarely stop to say hello or goodbye and seem uneasy when approaching me with questions.  I can't say I blame them:  Their actions are a result of the "I'm too damn busy for you" signals I send off whenever they try to reach out to me.

Since reading Ripp's book, I've made a conscious effort to make being fully present a priority in my room.  Whenever a student has approached me, I've given them my eyes, attention and heart.  The results have been rewarding: I've learned alongside and laughed with more with kids in the last two weeks than I had in the previous two months.  I've also strengthened relationships with quirky kids who needed to feel valued and seen my students reinvest -- both in me and in my classroom.

In a lot of ways, I'm ashamed of who I was for the majority of this school year.  While my kids are pretty darn prepared for our end of grade exam and while I churned through my daily and weekly tasks with brutal efficiency, I missed out on countless opportunities to remind kids that they matter.

I'm just thankful I've got a few weeks left to try to make things right.

________________________

Related Radical Reads:

Teaching is a Grind

Book Review: Passionate Learners

This is Why I Teach: Inspiring Jake

 

20 Comments

Wendi Pillars commented on June 7, 2014 at 9:56am:

Thanks, Bill.

Bill, I've found myself envisioning many times when I've been "too busy" to acknowledge questions, or even allow those first few minutes for kids to foster our classroom community each morning. 

It hurts to reflect on those times. And yes, #buriedbythegrind is especially spot on this year.  (#NCpeepofmine) But, every moment we can recapture is worth it. And we need to remember that learning is indeed social. If they're not "with us" emotionally, it makes a huge difference. They have uncanny super student spidey senses to pick up on our vibes, for better or worse.  

I daresay, though, that within such a short time, you wouldn't have been able to "reconnect" with your kids unless you already had a solid foundation and understanding. Perhaps #buriedbythegrind also blinded you to the respect you already gained through your high expectations. 

I know as a colleague, I always look forward to your insights because they resonate so deeply. You know how to connect, and I suspect you've been doing so all along in your classroom--it's just that now you're more conscious of it. 

Bill Ferriter Bill Ferriter commented on June 7, 2014 at 3:26pm:

Wendi wrote:

Wendi wrote:

And we need to remember that learning is indeed social. If they're not "with us" emotionally, it makes a huge difference. They have uncanny super student spidey senses to pick up on our vibes, for better or worse.  

-------------------

First, thanks for the kind words, Wendi.  I suspect you are right:  My guess is that I've made a bigger difference than I'm willing to give myself credit for.  I was probably a good teacher this year.  The hitch is good isn't what I'm shooting for.  My goal is to be great. 

This quote really resonates with me.  If we aren't committed to emotionally connecting with our kids, our classrooms are pointless -- for both us AND our kids. 

Needed that reminder.

Bill

Chris Garcia commented on June 9, 2014 at 7:18pm:

#Authenticity

Bill,

You got me with "In a lot of ways, I'm ashamed of who I was for the majority of this school year." This statement is powerful for several reasons. One, you're showing humility. Two, you've opened up yourself for some deep reflection.

#Honesty

#Reflection

In a world where eye contact and multitasking on a smartphone are what I see people doing all over the place, it's encouraging to know that you recognize the importance of simple eye contact. That is something that I need to work on when communicating with my students. I humbly share this testimony with you in that I've learned that finding those two minute life stories (in the middle of my lessons or to start off the day) of my experiences as a child has empowered my relationships with my students. They're able to see that the struggles of adolescents don't change much throughout time.

"Eye contact is one of the biggest tools we have as teachers to establish trust, community, and respect. If you want to tell a child that they matter, look at them when they speak with you. Stop and be present whenever you can, rather than multitask."

This statement from Pernille Ripp convicts me to the core, because it is filled with so much truth. The words that stand out to me are the following:

  • trust
  • community
  • respect

Now that you've been able to redeem the time with your students, would you consider creating a lesson for the first three days of school that could focus on these three words? You've clearly inspired me with your authenticity and encouragement. It's teachers like you that give new teachers like me a consistent fresh prospective. More importantly, your honesty gives me consistent hope in this profession.

Thanks for sharing and being real!

#RealTalk

Chris

P.S. If you have a twitter, I'd love to keep in touch. Follow me at www.twitter.com/chrisgarcia03

Bill Ferriter Bill Ferriter commented on June 11, 2014 at 6:18pm:

Chris wrote:

Chris wrote:

Now that you've been able to redeem the time with your students, would you consider creating a lesson for the first three days of school that could focus on these three words?

-----------------------

No pressure, huh Chris?! 

What's interesting is that I'm not sure that I'll really need a lesson for this one.  Eye contact is something that I don't have to formally plan or schedule -- and not kidding:  It works.  My kids are smiling more and maintaining eye contact more and I can literally feel the connections. 

It's so simple and yet so powerful all in one.

BTW: Thanks for believing in teaching.  We need young teachers with energy to sustain our communities and our profession -- and I can't imagine that it is easy to believe in teaching in today's world.

Rock right on,

Bill

Deidra Gammill commented on June 7, 2014 at 10:34am:

Keeping It Real

Bill,

If you keep up all this honesty and transparency, I may end up being a better teacher. #prettydarnawesome

Like everyone who will read this blog, I can TOTALLY relate to what you're saying. There are so many legitimate, time-consuming, brain-taxing, emotion-busting THINGS that we are responsible for and accountable for as teachers, and none of those things include the actual kids. Yes, all that "stuff" is ultimately about/for/because of our students, but that human element - that's in a league all by itself. And that's just what we do between 8-4 (roughly) each day. We've also got our own families, friends, faith, lives!

I sometimes wonder if it's humanly possible to be the kinds of teachers/colleagues/parents/friends we are determined to be. What are we? Superheroes or something?

In fact, can you think of any TV/movie "super teacher" that had a life outside of his/her classroom? I'm thinking about the teachers from Dead Poets Society, Freedom Writers, Stand and Deliver, Smiles as Big as the Moon, Anne of Green Gables, (even Sister Act and Mighty Macs) .... What made these characters so phenomenal and life-changing for their students was the simple fact that their students WERE their whole universe (and very little screen time is given to lesson plans, paperwork, IEP meetings, faculty meetings, family ... these teachers spend the majority of their time TEACHING and interacting and loving on their kids).

I'd venture to say that movie/book/television teachers have functioned much like super models - both send the wrong message for real life people. Is it possible to have a perfect body, perfect hair, perfect make-up, all the time? Yes, if you have an air-brush. But that's not real life for young women, who then struggle with a healthy self-image. Is it possible for teachers to devote their entire existence to their students and providing life-changing, life-affirming learning experiences? Absolutely. Is it possible to do so while investing in your own family, your own life? Not as much.

I guess what I'm saying is that great teachers, like you and so many I've met here on the Collaboratory, fight discouragement and feeling like they're not doing enough -ever, because the standard we've been shown (the few teachers who are shown respect by our culture) are the ones who seem to be able to DO IT ALL. We want to be those kinds of teachers too, but we face a lifetime of it, not 120 minutes complete with a cool soundtrack.

In other words, cut yourself some slack. :)

I've been in a similar boat most of my teaching career (not just the past few months); some days/weeks/months, I seem to have energy to spare and invest heavily in my students. Other days/weeks/months, I cringe when students come before school to "hang out" or bring their lunches to my room, just to talk. Don't they know how much I have to do??? Don't they know that my brain hasn't been firing on all 6 cylinders for weeks because I haven't gotten more than 4 hours of sleep on any given night? Don't they know that I'm stressed out enough to cry?

I've found that when I am honest with my students; when I tell them what I'm dealing with, or that the previous class set my teeth on edge and I need them to make me laugh; when I say, "Guys, I'm not mad at you and I don't want to make you think I am, but this is what's got me tied in a knot right now" that my students step up and want to be part of the solution for me, even if it's just making me smile. I've been able to teach through migraines this year by being honest - I'd never have expected high school freshmen to be sensitive to it, but they lower their voices, work better with each other, pick and choose their questions with care - they have responded with maturity and grace.

Looking our kids in the eyes, talking to them honestly (not necessarily going into details, but being honest when we're having a tough day or are stressed by obligations) goes a long way in building those relationships. Much like being willing to say we're sorry when we mess up with them. Kids respect honesty, and frankly, I believe it's a huge part of being a good teacher and role model.

Bill Ferriter Bill Ferriter commented on June 7, 2014 at 3:32pm:

Deidra wrote:

Deidra wrote:

I'd venture to say that movie/book/television teachers have functioned much like super models - both send the wrong message for real life people. Is it possible to have a perfect body, perfect hair, perfect make-up, all the time? Yes, if you have an air-brush.

------------------------

Such a great analogy, Deidra! 

I might be making a slide out of this -- or writing a follow up post to spotlight this. 

You're right, too:  The popular vision of superteacher sets unhealthy expectations for all of us -- and it sets us up for failure in the eyes of the community. 

We have to rewrite the definitions of what is doable if we're going to have a chance at surviving.

Hope you're well,

Bill

Deidra Gammill commented on June 7, 2014 at 4:27pm:

Check your Inbox

Thanks Bill. I've sent you a couple of messages via your CTQ inbox asking for blogging advice. If you get a chance, I'd love some insight from an established pro. :)

Cheryl Suliteanu commented on June 12, 2014 at 5:53pm:

.

.

Erica Sison-Buenaventura commented on June 9, 2014 at 4:57pm:

Connections

In my life's experience, both as a student and an educator, I have always felt that students are more likely to do their very best work when they think the teacher cares about them.  When a student is in an environment where they feel loved, appreciated, respected, and cared for, their motivation for learning increases exponentially.  They are more likely to persevere through struggle, the classroom community is more cohesive, and they are more likely to feel like they belong to something really great.

Every teacher has a day or two where they could use an extra 5 minutes to do some extra prepping, answer an urgent email, or check to make sure everyone has turned in an assignment.  And every teacher often has a constant barrage of students asking them questions.  A technique that I would use would be to take a couple of seconds to make that important eye contact, and ask the student to either ask a friend, use their resources, and then if they cannot answer their own question after those efforts, then they can come talk to me.  If I am finding that many students are asking the same types of questions, I will address that question whole-class, so that everyone gets the information at once.

I also take the time whenever I can find it, to give students individualized attention.  Opportunities like that present themselves on a daily basis, such as when walking from the playground back to the classroom, at the tables during breakfast or lunch, or after dismissal.  Other times that don't occur as frequently would be during extracurricular activities, such as sports games, or during field trips. 

Establishing a relationship with your students is so beneficial for success in the school year.  Letting them know that you hear them and value them goes a long way in mitigating behavioral and motivation issues.  Students spend the majority of their waking hours at school; they only stand to thrive if their classroom is a safe space for them to tap into their potential.

Bill Ferriter Bill Ferriter commented on June 11, 2014 at 6:21pm:

Erica wrote:

Erica wrote:

Every teacher has a day or two where they could use an extra 5 minutes to do some extra prepping, answer an urgent email, or check to make sure everyone has turned in an assignment

--------------------

What I'm realizing, Erica, is that spending that extra time prepping isn't saving me anything.  Without strong relationships, the REST of my work is so much harder.  Investing in relationships isn't just the right thing to do or the powerful thing to do.  It makes my work more joyful and efficient and effective. 

Interesting, huh? 

Bill

Stacey A. commented on June 9, 2014 at 5:29pm:

Reflecting

Bill,

Thank you for sharing your experience. I admire you for recognizing something needed to change with your relationship with the students.

Your experience is something all teachers can relate to. Teachers always have the students’ best interest in mind. However, the idea time can often conflict teachers with what they would like to do and what they think they actually have time for.  

Finding the appropriate balance between family, planning, and building a relationship with students is vital. It is important to always make time for student interactions to build teacher-student rapport. I recently read an article called Visible Learning and the Science of How We Learn. It explains that by having a close and positive teacher-student relationship, it will increase their motivation and success in school. The students feel like they trust the teacher; thus, can better learn in the classroom environment.

You are a role model of integrity and character by reflecting on your relationship with the students and making changes. You were fortunate to get to know all your students on a deeper level, and I am sure they appreciated getting to know you! 

 

Kriza Casem commented on June 9, 2014 at 5:29pm:

Whole Heart

Hi, Bill,

I am very familiar with the challenge of creating those genuine connections with students due to being overwhelmed or busy. For the past two years, I served elementary students teaching science during 45-minute rotations.  It was a rewarding experience to teach every student in the school, but I would only see the same group of students anywhere from once every two weeks to once every two months!  Just establishing a connection with students can be challenging. 

The statement that eye contact "is one of the biggest tools we have as teachers to establish trust, community, and respect" is very true.  I believe eye contact to be the first indication that we are invested in our students as individuals.  The power of being honest also has a positive effect, and I have seen this in my previous teaching experiences.  When I let students know if we are faced with a situation where, for example, I may not be able to offer my full time to everyone in the group, they are sensitive to it.  However limited I may be with time, students know that when they are with me, they have my whole-hearted attention.  It is wonderful to know you were able to strengthen relationships with your students. Thank you so much for sharing your experiences and reflection

Tiffany Inocencio commented on June 9, 2014 at 5:57pm:

Importance of finding the balance that works

Bill,

As a teacher myself, I can agree with the feeling that there is never enough time in the day to teach all the content that we need to get through, so where are we going to find time to fit anything else in, such as building positive relationships with our students?  However, I can also reflect on my own experiences as a student who needed the support from my teachers when I went to school because I did not have a supporting environment in my own home.

Due to my own experiences, I realized what a positive impact the relationship between the teacher and students at school can make.  I know in my own experience, school became the buffer from my stresses in my home life.  The positive relationships with my teachers were the only positive relationships I had with adults at times.

Now, I try to create this "safe haven" that I was seeking when I was young, for the students in my own classroom.  Additionally, I really do try to create the "closeness" with my students.  By recently reading a chapter titled, "The teacher-student relationshiop" from the book, "Visible Learning and the Science of How We Learn," I learned that this "closeness" appears to be more under the teacher's control just as you mentioned.

In addition, that article mentions that teachers can spend just a few minutes each day with an individual student who is at risk to improve this relationship.  When I tried this strategy with one of my at risk students two years ago, not only did our teacher-student relationship improve, but so did his self-confidence and student work production.  In my opinion, this was a direct result of me taking the time, two minutes a day, to make sure he felt that he was validated in my classroom.

I really liked the sentence you started this article with, "I've got an embarrassing confession to make:  I haven't felt super connected to my kids this year."  I feel that you have already self-reflected on this issue and have made the positive change that your students need.  The impact of your actions may not show immediately in your own classroom this year, but know that by creating positive relationships with your students, you are creating positive cascades that will continue to impact your students lives forever. 

Again, great self-reflection, and I compliment you for taking steps to make the positive changes all students need as learners.

Tiffany Inocencio commented on June 9, 2014 at 5:58pm:

Importance of finding the balance that works

Bill,

As a teacher myself, I can agree with the feeling that there is never enough time in the day to teach all the content that we need to get through, so where are we going to find time to fit anything else in, such as building positive relationships with our students?  However, I can also reflect on my own experiences as a student who needed the support from my teachers when I went to school because I did not have a supporting environment in my own home.

Due to my own experiences, I realized what a positive impact the relationship between the teacher and students at school can make.  I know in my own experience, school became the buffer from my stresses in my home life.  The positive relationships with my teachers were the only positive relationships I had with adults at times.

Now, I try to create this "safe haven" that I was seeking when I was young, for the students in my own classroom.  Additionally, I really do try to create the "closeness" with my students.  By recently reading a chapter titled, "The teacher-student relationshiop" from the book, "Visible Learning and the Science of How We Learn," I learned that this "closeness" appears to be more under the teacher's control just as you mentioned.

In addition, that article mentions that teachers can spend just a few minutes each day with an individual student who is at risk to improve this relationship.  When I tried this strategy with one of my at risk students two years ago, not only did our teacher-student relationship improve, but so did his self-confidence and student work production.  In my opinion, this was a direct result of me taking the time, two minutes a day, to make sure he felt that he was validated in my classroom.

I really liked the sentence you started this article with, "I've got an embarrassing confession to make:  I haven't felt super connected to my kids this year."  I feel that you have already self-reflected on this issue and have made the positive change that your students need.  The impact of your actions may not show immediately in your own classroom this year, but know that by creating positive relationships with your students, you are creating positive cascades that will continue to impact your students lives forever. 

Again, great self-reflection, and I compliment you for taking steps to make the positive changes all students need as learners.

Candy commented on June 9, 2014 at 6:59pm:

Bill,

Bill,

I agree that teaching can be one of the most challenging jobs; however it is the most rewarding.  You did the right thing by simply reflecting on your practice and coming the the realization of how it affected your students.  We can be the greatest positive role model to our students and it's important to remember that.  Sometimes all we may have time to do is smile or give our students verbal praise; but just these small gestures can mean the world to our students.  My greatest role model as a child was my fourth grade teacher.  It's amazing that I can still recall her genuine compassion and empathy for us students.  Her positive character and love influenced my lifelong dream of becoming a teacher.  I know too that our students can hold a special place in their memories for us.  We can all be that special teacher that inspires.  Sometimes we need to remind ourselves why we teach; we teach because we love children and the process of learning.  It is about finding balance in the chaos.  Our students do need to feel that we value them, that we are grateful they are with us, and that we genuinely care about them as people.  We may be the only positive influence our students have and for them to feel that positive connection from either their teachers or parental figures is vital to their longterm well-being and success.  Nothing is more powerful than a great teacher and education.  It is the greatest equalizer.  We have such an important role; it can be overwhelming yet it's the most meaningful job in the world isn't it?  Thank you for posting your reflection.  It is inspirational to read how you self-reflected and made a positive shift for your students.  We all struggle, but the important part is to get back up when we fall.  You did just that.  Best wishes.  

Candy

Jeffrey Jones commented on June 9, 2014 at 7:16pm:

Bill,

Bill,

I have been very lucky to teach math in an elementary setting.  Instead of getting only 50 minutes a day, I get to teach math 90 minutes a day to three classes.  Even with this abundance of time, I still find myself finding it difficult to accomplish everything I need to do.  One thing I have always had time for, though, is positive interaction with my students.  

Kids at the middle school lelvel are very perceptive and can tell if a teacher is giving a 100% or is just phoning it in.  I make sure my students know that I am working just as hard as they are when it comes to their academic acievement.  Not only do I listen to them, hear what they are saying, but I joke and tease with them as a sign of affection and acceptance.  I want my students to understand that I value their presence in their classroom and, most times, enjoy their company. 

Because I do make a concerted effort to not only listen to my students, but connect with thier lives, my classroom is always a positive friendly place where everyone wants to learn.  During instruction time, there is always some friendly interaction between my students and myself.  These kids see that I am not some stern authority figure, but an actual person who is involved with the improvement of their lives.  Through personal interaction, a teacher gets to know the studetns and thus creates more of an incentive to ensure that all of them achieve academically and socially.

But don't worry Bill, there's always next year.

Rachel Simpson commented on June 9, 2014 at 9:12pm:

Wow! I feel better already!

Reading these blog posts really makes me feel better about my accomplishments,and reflect on my needs this year! It is empowering to see that so many teachers are in the same boat! 

I recently had the opporunity to read Visible Learning and the Scince of How We Learn that reviews a lot of Dr. Pianta's research into building positive teacher/student relationships. One of the pieces of information that stuck out the most was that building a positive teacher/student relationship is obtained through warmth, closeness and absence of conflicts. She states that these traits affect a student and classroom that can trust each other, as well as me, their teacher. After reading your comments, advice and keeping in mind the recent text I've read, I feel confident going into next year with more smiles, openess and positivity. 

Tiffany, I absolutely agree with you. Keeping my own experiences in school in mind will also help formulate my instruction next year.

Thank you all!

http://visible-learning.org/2013/07/hattie-yates-visible-learning-and-the-science-of-how-we-learn/

 

 

Brittany Mabe commented on June 9, 2014 at 9:14pm:

In the check-out line...

Hi Bill,

   Thank you for your honesty. If we’re all being honest, we can all fall prey to the demands of our daily lives. I appreciate that you were bold to share your struggles publicly so that we can all benefit from what you discovered.

   You have intrigued me about the book, Passionate Learners. I’m excited to go home and check it out on Amazon. I think just about everyone in the world could benefit from some good eye contact. If it’s not lacking in our classrooms, it probably is at home, in passing, or even just in the check-out line. Sometimes we shortchange acquaintances, friends, and even families of eye contact. On the other side of things, it is extremely frustrating to feel like you talk and share and get no response from another person. I know that’s not our intention to do that to other people, and we certainly do not want that ourselves.

    Realizing that this is happening and then desiring to make amends is key. I love that you were able to turn things around in your classroom at the end of the year! Students will ultimately be the most successful when they feel that support and connection. Whether they are just asking to go to the office, or if they need to share something person, having someone look you in the eye tells you whether or not that person is truly listening. Listening is the grounds for learning, whether it be academic skills or social skills!

    Again, thank you for sharing! This was a great challenge to me, both in the classroom and out of the classroom… It’s so easy to get busy in the whirlwind of our lives and bounce from thing to thing without connecting with those around us, especially the ones we have such a profound effect on. Thanks Bill!!  :)

Breana Mahoney commented on June 9, 2014 at 9:45pm:

Building That Connection

Bill,

An important quality in any teacher is the ability to self reflect. We are not going to be able to be perfect every day and we will make mistakes. I appreciate your willingness to share your experience. 

It is easy to get caught up in all of the demands that come with being a teacher. You are expected to go at a certain pace when sometimes your students just need some extra time on certain topics. Instead you are pushing through and going on to the next topic. One thing that I find important to stop and do every day is to remind myself why I am there. I am ultimately there for the students. What I also find helpful is on on days that I am feeling overwhelmed, stressed from the job, and realize that I am neglecting the needs of the students in my classroom, I try to find inspiration again just as you did when you read the book Passionate Learners. Inspiration can be found everywhere. Some ways that I have found my inspiration again after a long day is through reading an article, talking to a colleague, or even researching new practices to use with your students to help engage them. In our classrooms it is crucial to create an environment where our students feel safe and feel that they can come to us to ask questions, clarify something, and most importantly ask for help. Something as simple as giving the students eye contact when they talk to us helps reasure them that they can come to us. A crucial part of teaching is building a positive relationship our students. One thing that stood out to me is when you said  "Whenever a student has approached me, I've given them my eyes, attention, and heart". I like that you pointed out when you looked at your students when they were talking to you, you did not just look at them. You gave them your full attention. It is important to point out that just giving your students eye contact is not being fully present in the conversations you have with them. 

It is a rewarding experience to to see the change in your students when you have made a change within yourself and the way you were doing something. Again Bill, thank you for being willing to share your experience with us. I believe it is something that many teachers can relate to. This may even be the inspiration others needed to find that are in a similar situation. 

Cheryl Suliteanu commented on June 10, 2014 at 6:38pm:

what really matters?

Every year I hope to make strong, nurturing, and lasting relationships with my students and their families.  Some years, I'm more successful than others for any variety of reasons.  Every year, I want to do better the next year.

Why is it that you (teachers reading this) feel you have to stay so late at school and work through all your potential times you could spend connecting with students?  What are the demands that are more important to attend to than connecting with our students? 

As the Vergara lawsuit in Los Angeles demonstrates, we as teachers need to focus on the relationships we make between families and our community in order to strengthen our profession now more than ever.  The tragedy of the public's misunderstanding of teachers, teachers' work demands, and teachers' unions is creating a chasm in our society that is reaching frightening depths.

So what are we going to do about it?

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