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CTQ bloggers write about transforming teaching. Share their posts and chime in!

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Apples & Oranges: Why This Year's State Test Was a Waste of Students' Time

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Last week a group of CTQ-Colorado teachers attended and offered comments at the State Board of Education meeting. The following post is a written version of my remarks. While the board passed a symbolic resolution (in a 4-3 partyline vote) to withdraw from PARCC, one state board member boldy and publicly supported the standards and advocated for the aligned system our students deserve. If we must insist on a standardized test, I want the best one for my students. Core advocates (and skeptics!) -- I hope you'll park your thoughts on PARCC (& Smarter Balanced) here. 

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Speak Less, Act Right

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The first time I read these words by a Holocaust survivor, they haunted me. “My eyes saw what no person should witness: gas chambers built by learned engineers. Children poisoned by educated physicians. So I am suspicious of education. My request is: Help your children become human.” To fulfill that request, our actions matter far more than our words.

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Advice to Myself as a New Teacher

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Dear Mr. Barnwell (version 2004),

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Chào mừng bạn đến Quốc Hoa Kỳ (Welcome to the United States)

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Opening up my e-mail and sipping on my third coffee of the morning, I read the following message:

“Hello teachers.  Please welcome a new 10th grader, Ngoc Trinh, coming to us from Vietnam. We will have to do our best to support this student with her limited English skills.”

“Uh oh…” was my first thought. 

Featured

Simple Truth: Hashtags Can Save You Time

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If there was ONE thing that I'd want every practicing educator to know about learning in social spaces it would be that no matter what field you are working in, there are TONS of folks who are sharing resources t

Featured

Why Don't Those Teachers Own Their Profession Already?

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Hypothetically speaking, let's say a subset of all teachers decided to go against their district's wishes, teaching their curriculum according to a mix of research and expertise, but masking it under the name of the latest district buzzword. Would you blame them for not outright fighting against their administration's wishes or congratulate them for "owning" their profession?

Of course, that's a trick question because it largely depends on your lens.

Latest Blog Posts

Bill Ferriter

March 20, 2012

What do YOU know about the creative commons?

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Quick question:  The last time that you needed an image for a project, where did you get it from? Google, right?  That nifty little Images tab makes it SO easy to find just the right shot for your slide deck, doesn't it?

Here's the thing:  Pictures -- just like text, music and video -- are protected by copyright even when they're posted on the Internet.  That means there's a GOOD chance that when you grab a picture from Google, you're stealing it using it inappropriately. 

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Bill Ferriter

March 17, 2012

What can schools learn from Kobe's struggles?

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Sports fans LOVE their heroes, don't they?  When crunch time comes for our favorite teams, we just KNOW that our favorite superstar is going to rise to the occasion and single-handedly save the day. 

And no sport creates more opportunities for individuals to become hometown heroes than basketball. 

With five players on either team covering each other man-to-man, isolated match-ups pairing the two best players on the floor against one another in a showdown for sporting glory are easy to manufacture.

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Bill Ferriter

March 13, 2012

Practice-centered observation protocol [Handout]

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I don't have a ton of time to write tonight, y'all -- trying to catch up after the curveball that life threw at me last week -- but I wanted to share a handout that I think might be useful for anyone working in a professional learning community.

Called a Practice-Centered Observation Protocol, it is designed to guide teachers through the process of observing their peers in action:

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Bill Ferriter

March 10, 2012

So much more than a personal learning network

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A little over a week ago, my Dad passed away after a four year battle with lung cancer.  Wrestling with the loss, I wrote to him here on the Radical. 

For me, writing to my Dad made sense simply because he read everything that I wrote.  My post was one way for me to say thank you and goodbye to him all at once.  I felt better after finishing it even if I was silently crying in the back of the McDonalds where I was writing.

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Dan Brown

March 8, 2012

The MetLife data is compelling: Fear is a defining element in american schools

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This week’s release of the MetLife Survey of the American Teacher: Teachers, Parents, and the Economy illustrates just how fear-plagued our schools have become. The whole report is worth reading, but check out this data (interspersed with my commentary):

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Shannon Cde Baca

March 4, 2012

Chatting about #edtech from the middle of the Pacific

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I work—and sometimes it feels like I live—in cyberspace. So, this month’s #teaching2030 Twitter chat on integrating technology was my kind of chat. First, the amazing technology that we chat about allowed me to facilitate this chat from Maui. I teach online and have connected with my kids from Maui each winter, New Mexico and [...]

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