Skip to main content

Join the Community

or Close

Search

CTQ Blogs

CTQ bloggers write about transforming teaching. Share their posts and chime in!

Featured

11 Collaboratory conversations you don’t want to miss!

1 comment

Our virtual community is turning 11! To celebrate: 11 productive conversations to give you a rush of professional insight, whether you have an hour or just 5 minutes.

Featured

Teachers! Leave Those Kids Alone.

5 comments

When most of us were children, we had a lot of unsupervised time to explore. Sometimes we got lost. Sometimes we got hurt. We faced bullies, cranky adults, and aggressive neighborhood dogs. These adventures helped us learn to negotiate risk as we explored the ragged borders of our world.

Our students need exploration, complexity, and the risk of failure. If we spare them from struggle, we might rob them of fulfillment, too.

Featured

On unions and the future of the teaching profession

10 comments

I’m no blame-the-unions pundit. After all, management—not unions—have imposed many of the rules that stifle creative (heck, even just sensible) practices in schools.

But here’s the plain truth: it’s time for unions to innovate.

Latest Blog Posts

Renee Moore

April 10, 2014

What Should and Should Not Change About National Board Certification?

4 comments

Most of us who have completed the National Board Certification process agree that is one of the most significant, transformative experiences of our careers.

We would also be the first to point out that the process could be better.

Until this year, the entire process was paper-based, starting and ending with a big, blue and white box.  The process is very long and labor intensive on the candidate, processing staff, and scorers, which is why it is also very expensive—more than board certification for other professions.

Continue Reading…

Sandy Merz

April 7, 2014

Common Core Math Instruction: Managing a Tri-polar System

2 comments

I first saw it on Facebook.

A parent's letter to a teacher suggesting that the method used to teach subtraction was unnecessarily complicated and that an alternative approach was readily available.

Next, I saw State Superintendent of Public Instruction John Huppenthal answering questions about education in Arizona. A whiteboard with lots of Xs, Os, and arrows was propped against a chair off to the side. I thought it was a football play. But then a mother held it up explained it was how her child's teacher explained simple computations. 

Continue Reading…

Justin Minkel

April 6, 2014

Teachers! Leave Those Kids Alone.

5 comments

When most of us were children, we had a lot of unsupervised time to explore. Sometimes we got lost. Sometimes we got hurt. We faced bullies, cranky adults, and aggressive neighborhood dogs. These adventures helped us learn to negotiate risk as we explored the ragged borders of our world.

Our students need exploration, complexity, and the risk of failure. If we spare them from struggle, we might rob them of fulfillment, too.

Continue Reading…

Renee Moore

April 3, 2014

My Favorite TeachMoore Posts 2013

0 comments

Doing some spring cleaning, and going through my file of blog posts, I realized that some things I wrote in 2013 are really special, and worthy of revisiting. Join me, won’t you, and share your thoughts.

“It’s Not the Technology; It’s the Teachers”  - Oct. 20, 2013

Learning From Our Elders About Using Social Media – Sept. 9, 2013

Continue Reading…

Subscribe to Blogs

Stay Informed

Sign up to receive the latest news and events through email!

Sign Up